Stem Cell Therapy May Improve Outcomes in Knee Surgery and Osteoarthritis: Optimum Performance

Share with:

FacebookTwitterGoogle


A research article published by the Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery (JBJS.org) found that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the potential to improve knee joints after surgery.  The study, a phase I/II randomized, double blind, controlled study of MSCs that were delivered by a single injection after a knee surgery, involved 60 patients between the ages of 16 and 60. At the end of the study, those who were injected with adult MSCs saw an improvement in knee pain as well as evidence of meniscus regeneration. Also, there were no ectopic tissue formations in any of the patients who participated in the study. Kevin Darr, a board certified orthopedic surgeon who is currently involved in 5 independent review board studies says, “The reason patients are improving is due to the fact that stem cells decrease the inflammation associated with osteoarthritis and are nourishing existing cartilage cells, allowing the cells the potential to repair. The stem cells can also differentiate into new cartilage cells.” Darr’s research to date is showing that patients can potentially avoid a surgical procedure with injections of mesenchymal stem cells. For more information on the study, click here.

The post Stem Cell Therapy May Improve Outcomes in Knee Surgery and Osteoarthritis: Optimum Performance appeared first on Celltex Therapeutics.

Share with:

FacebookTwitterGoogle